Monthly Archives: January 2021

Reduce temptation by blocking images

Web shops try to tempt customers into unnecessary and even harmful purchases, including grocery and food ordering sites which promote unhealthy meals. The temptation can be reduced by blocking images on shopping websites. I find it useful when ordering food. Similarly, Facebook and news sites try to tempt viewers with clickbait and ads. To reduce my time-wasting, I make the clickbait less attractive by blocking images. The pictures in most news stories do not contribute any information – a story about a firm has a photo of the main building or logo of the firm or the face of its CEO, a “world leaders react to x” story has pictures of said leaders.

The blocking may require a browser extension (“block images”) and each browser and version has a little different steps for this.

In Chromium on 20 Jan 2021, no extension is needed:

1) click the three vertical dots at the top right,

2) click Settings to go to chrome://settings/,

3) scroll down to Site settings, click it,

4) scroll down to Images, click it.

5) Click the Add button to the right of the Block heading. A dialog pops up to enter a web address.

6) Copy the url of the site on which you want to block pictures, for example https://webshop.com into the Site field.

If seeing the images is necessary for some reason, then re-enable images on the website: follow steps 1-4 above, then click the three vertical dots under the Add button under the Block heading. A menu of three options pops up. Click the Allow option.

Alternatively, you may block all images on all websites and then allow only specific sites to show images. For this, follow steps 1-4 above, then click the blue button to the right of the Allow all (recommended) heading. Then click the Add button next to Allow. A dialog pops up to enter a web address. Copy the url of the site on which you want to block pictures, for example https://webshop.com into the Site field.

Dilution effect explained by signalling

Signalling confidence in one’s arguments explains the dilution effect in marketing and persuasion. The dilution effect is that the audience averages the strength of a persuader’s arguments instead of adding the strengths. More arguments in favour of a position should intuitively increase the confidence in the correctness of this position, but empirically, adding weak arguments reduces people’s belief, which is why drug advertisements on US late-night TV list mild side effects in addition to serious ones. The target audience of these ads worries less about side effects when the ad mentions more slight problems with the drug, although additional side effects, whether weak or strong, should make the drug worse.

A persuader who believes her first argument to be strong enough to convince everyone does not waste valuable time to add other arguments. Listeners evaluate arguments partly by the confidence they believe the speaker has in these claims. This is rational Bayesian updating because a speaker’s conviction in the correctness of what she says is positively correlated with the actual validity of the claims.

A countervailing effect is that a speaker with many arguments has spent significant time studying the issue, so knows more precisely what the correct action is. If the listeners believe the bias of the persuader to be small or against the action that the arguments favour, then the audience should rationally believe a better-informed speaker more.

An effect in the same direction as dilution is that a speaker with many arguments in favour of a choice strongly prefers the listeners to choose it, i.e. is more biased. Then the listeners should respond less to the persuader’s effort. In the limit when the speaker’s only goal is always for the audience to comply, at any time cost of persuasion, then the listeners should ignore the speaker because a constant signal carries no information.

Modelling

Start with the standard model of signalling by information provision and then add countersignalling.

The listeners choose either to do what the persuader wants or not. The persuader receives a benefit B if the listeners comply, otherwise receives zero.

The persuader always presents her first argument, otherwise reveals that she has no arguments, which ends the game with the listeners not doing what the persuader wants. The persuader chooses whether to spend time at cost c>0, c<B to present her second argument, which may be strong or weak. The persuader knows the strength of the second argument but the listeners only have the common prior belief that the probability of a strong second argument is p0. If the second argument is strong, then the persuader is confident, otherwise not.

If the persuader does not present the second argument, then the listeners receive an exogenous private signal in {1,0} about the persuader’s confidence, e.g. via her subconscious body language. The probabilities of the signals are Pr(1|confident) =Pr(0|not) =q >1/2. If the persuader presents the second argument, then the listeners learn the confidence with certainty and can ignore any signals about it. Denote by p1 the updated probability that the audience puts on the second argument being strong.

If the speaker presents a strong second argument, then p1=1, if the speaker presents a weak argument, then p1=0, if the speaker presents no second argument, then after signal 1, the audience updates their belief to p1(1) =p0*q/(p0*q +(1-p0)*(1-q)) >p0 and after signal 0, to p1(0) =p0*(1-q)/(p0*(1-q) +(1-p0)*q) <p0.

The listeners prefer to comply (take action a=1) when the second argument of the persuader is strong, otherwise prefer not to do what the persuader wants (action a=0). At the prior belief p0, the listeners prefer not to comply. Therefore a persuader with a strong second argument chooses max{B*1-c, q*B*1 +(1-q)*B*0} and presents the argument iff (1-q)*B >c. A persuader with a weak argument chooses max{B*0-c, (1-q)*B*1 +q*B*0}, always not to present the argument. If a confident persuader chooses not to present the argument, then the listeners use the exogenous signal, otherwise use the choice of presentation to infer the type of the persuader.

One extension is that presenting the argument still leaves some doubt about its strength.

Another extension has many argument strength levels, so each type of persuader sometimes presents the second argument, sometimes not.

In this standard model, if the second argument is presented, then always by the confident type. As is intuitive, the second argument increases the belief of the listeners that the persuader is right. Adding countersignalling partly reverses the intuition – a very confident type of the persuader knows that the first argument already reveals her great confidence, so the listeners do what the very confident persuader wants. The very confident type never presents the second argument, so if the confident type chooses to present it, then the extra argument reduces the belief of the audience in the correctness of the persuader. However, compared to the least confident type who also never presents the second argument, the confident type’s second argument increases the belief of the listeners.