University incentives not to punish cheating

Universities have incentives not to expel cheaters, because these students would stop paying fees. By extension, there is a motive to avoid punishing academic dishonesty in any way that increases the chance of the student dropping out, like giving a cheater a failing grade. The university then gives a similar incentive not to punish academic dishonesty to its departments, who then pass on these incentives to faculty. In every university I have been in, it is far easier for a faculty member to do nothing about cheating – it requires no work, as opposed to a lot of bureaucracy documenting the cheating, imposing the punishment, dealing with the appeals, etc. There is no punishment for a faculty member who fails to report cheating, but to be fair, also no punishment for a false accusation of cheating, or an accusation that does not have sufficient evidence or gets overturned on appeal.

Even if a faculty member tries to punish academic dishonesty, the cheating student appeals to the university hierarchy and the higher-ups overturn the punishment. If not the first level of the hierarchy, then one of the higher levels. Thus even an inherently honest professor who for psychological reasons would be willing to spend the time to document academic dishonesty if it led to the cheater getting punished does not do so, because in the end there is no punishment.

A solution is to change university incentives: the students who are expelled because of cheating must pay their fees in full for their entire course of studies. A problem is that this leads to legal challenges because the student is not getting the education service but must pay for it. One solution is to require the tuition paid up front, non-refundable on expulsion for cheating. However, in this case students have to take a loan (which may be prevented by credit constraints or risk aversion) and may instead choose universities that do not charge them up front.

The university-side incentives also seem problematic if tuition is fully paid for expelled cheaters, because the university could save on the teaching costs by kicking out all the students on fabricated charges and keep the money. The long-term reputation cost for the university prevents such rip-offs.

A milder way to improve the university incentives is to require the cheater to re-take the course. This may delay the time at which the cheater can take follow-up courses that have the re-taken course as a prerequisite. The resulting delay in graduation may require the cheater to pay extra fees for the additional time, but the extra payment of course depends on the specific regulations of the university.

Virulence of a disease may cause vaccines to be effective

My uninformed speculation: vaccines may be so effective against Covid-19 (90-95% vs flu vaccine 70%) for the same reason why Covid-19 is so infectious – it binds strongly to biochemicals in the organism. If high affinity to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 on the surfaces of lung cells is positively correlated with strong binding to antibodies and immune cells, then the immune system, once triggered, removes the viral particles faster for those respiratory viruses that infect cells more easily. Strong binding and the consequent intense immune triggering may also be the reason for the life-threatening immune overreaction (cytokine storm) to the novel coronavirus.
This hypothesis could be tested on a cross-sectional dataset of viral diseases using some measure of the infectiousness of a disease, the effectiveness of a vaccine against it and the frequency of immune overreaction to it.
Infectiousness may be measured by ID50: what number of microbes makes half the organisms exposed to this number sick. This measure depends on the state of the organisms studied. For example, if people’s immune system is weaker in the winter on average, then ID50 measured in the winter is lower than in the summer.
Vaccine effectiveness is typically measured in percent – what fraction of vaccinated people are protected, in the sense that they do not catch the disease in circumstances in which unvaccinated people catch it. This measure of may depend on what the exposure to the disease is. For example, if a large enough dose of the microbe makes everyone sick, vaccinated or no, then exposure to this dose shows zero effect of the vaccine. Similarly, if a small enough dose fails to infect anyone, then the vaccine effect seems zero, but at least the lack of infections among the unvaccinated shows that no information about vaccine efficacy can be obtained from this exposure test.
Immune overreaction needs to be confidently ascribable to the disease studied for it to be a relevant measure for testing the theory about the connection between virulence and vaccine efficacy.

Preventing cheating is hopeless in online learning

Technology makes cheating easy even in in-person exams with invigilators next to the test-taker. For example, in-ear wireless headphones not visible externally can play a loop recording of the most important concepts of the tested material. A development of this idea is to use a hidden camera in the test-takers glasses or pen to send the exam contents to a helper who looks up the answers and transmits the spoken solutions via the headphones. Without a helper, sophisticated programming is needed: the image of the exam from the hidden camera is sent to a text-recognition (OCR) program, which pipes it to a web search or an online solver such as Wolfram Alpha, then uses a text-to-speech program to speak the results into the headphones.

A small screen on the inside of the glasses would be visible to a nearby invigilator, so is a risky way to transmit solutions. A small projector in the glasses could in theory display a cheat sheet right into the eye. The reflection from the eye would be small and difficult to detect even looking into the eyes of the test-taker, which are mostly pointed down at the exam.

If the testing is remote, then the test-taker could manipulate the cameras through which the invigilators watch, so that images of cheat sheets are replaced with the background and the sound of helpers saying answers is removed. The sound is easy to remove with a microphone near the mouth of the helper, the input of which is subtracted from the input of the computer webcam. A more sophisticated array of microphones feeding sound into small speakers near the web camera’s microphone can be used to subtract a particular voice from the web camera’s stereo microphone’s input. The technology is the same as in noise-cancelling headphones.

Replacing parts of images is doable even if the camera and its software are provided by the examiners and completely non-manipulable. The invigilators’ camera can be pointed at a screen which displays an already-edited video of the test-taker. The editing is fast enough to make it nearly real-time. The idea of the edited video is the same as in old crime movies where a photo of an empty room is stuck in front of a stationary security camera. Then the guard sees the empty room on the monitor no matter what actually goes on in the room.

There is probably a way to make part of the scene invisible to a camera even with 19th century technology, namely the Pepper’s Ghost illusion with a two-way mirror. The edges of the mirror have to be hidden somehow.

All public statues should be removed

There is no benefit to spending taxpayer money on creating or sustaining personality cults. The same goes for all public art – the current (local) government should not decide on which people to popularise. No significant market failure exists in physical art objects. The government thus does not need to intervene in the market for statues (copying digital art is another matter). Private individuals can put almost any statues and art on their own property as part of free speech.

The materials of which the statues are made could be used for something beneficial instead, like public housing for the poorest members of society. Clearly the government’s goal in erecting statues is to provide circus to the public in order to get re-elected, not to benefit society.

If the influential people whom the statues depict were asked whether the person or the idea matters more, my guess is that almost all would emphasise the idea. Most would ask the resources to be spent on more reasonable things than statues of them.

If the goal of a statue is to signal the importance of the ideas of the person depicted, then there are more efficient ways for this signalling. For example, a scholarship, a charity or a public library in the name of the person.

Partial cleaning may make surfaces look dirtier

The reason why incomplete cleaning may increase the visual perception of dirt is by increasing the contrast between the patches of thicker grime and the normal colour by removing a uniform covering of thinner dirt. If something is uniformly grimy, then the colour of the covering dirt may be perceived as the thing’s normal hue. Cleaning may remove approximately the same thickness of dirt from all points on the surface. If some patches initially have a thicker layer, then these remain the colour of the dirt after the cleaning, but other areas may be fully cleaned and revert to the original look of the surface. The human visual system mostly perceives contrast, not the absolute wavelength of the reflected light, as various optical illusions demonstrate. Higher contrast between the thicker patches of grime and the rest of the surface then enhances the perception of dirtiness.

Bar-coding videos to prevent faking

To prevent clips from being cut out of a video or inserted, add a non-repeating sequence of bar codes onto either the whole frame or the main object of the video, such as a person talking. The bar code can use subtle „watermark” shading that does not interfere with viewing – it only needs to be readable by computer. The sequence of bar codes can be recreated at a later time if the algorithm is known, so if a clip is cut out of the video or added, then the sequence no longer matches the replication. Altering the video frame by frame also changes the bar code, although the forger can bypass this security feature by reading the original bar code, removing it before retouching and adding it back later. Still, these extra steps make faking the video somewhat more difficult. The main security feature is that the length of the video cannot be changed without altering the sequence of bar codes, which is easily detected.

The maker of the video may generate the bar codes cryptographically using a private key. This enables confirming the source of the video, for example in a copyright dispute.

Probably the idea of bar-coding videos has already been implemented, because watermarks and time stamps on photos have long been used. The main novelty relative to treating each frame as a photo is to link the bar codes to each other over time.

Tissue sampling by piggybacking on vaccination or testing campaigns

Obtaining tissue samples from a large population of healthy individuals is useful for many research and testing applications. Establishing the distribution of genes, transcriptomes, cell distributions and morpologies in a normal population allows comparing clinical laboratory findings to reference values obtained from this baseline. The genetic composition of the population can be used to estimate historical migration patterns in paleoanthropology and selective pressures in evolutionary biology.

Gathering tissue samples from many people is expensive and time-consuming, unless it happens as a byproduct of existing programs. Collecting used vaccination needles or coronavirus nasal swabs that have a few cells attached allows anonymous tissue sampling of almost the entire population. A few cells per person are enough for many analyses in modern biology. Bulk collection of needles or swabs has built-in untraceability of biological material to an individual, which should alleviate privacy concerns and reduce the bureaucratic burden of ethics approvals.

Flight cameras for environmental and traffic monitoring

Recordings from the downward-pointing cameras on commercial airliners that provide inflight belly-cam views could be downloaded after landing to use for research, for example on vegetation cover, traffic density on roads, night-time light which measures economic development. The flight paths are saved on flight tracking websites anyway, which enables localising the video at any point of time to the GPS coordinates the flight was at. The recordings are not much use for military spying because countries ban overflights of sensitive sites anyway. Thus security and privacy arguments should not stop research in this case.

The resolution of the belly cameras is low and the wavelengths cover only visible light, not infrared which would be useful for vegetation measurements. The compensating upside is the frequent overflights of many parts of the globe, thus the dense temporal coverage. The videos are almost costless to obtain – just plug an external hard drive into the existing inflight entertainment system to and later upload its contents at the airport. The low cost contrasts with specialised satellite and aerial surveys.

Algae tattooed for doping and oxygen administration

The paper by Qiao et al. (2020) in Science Advances shows that unicellular algae injected near a hypoxic tumour photosynthesise oxygen in the body in response to infrared light with wavelength 660nm that penetrates >4mm into tissues. The oxygen saturation of the tumour rises from 6.2% to 30% in 2 hours after the algae receive a 5-minute laser exposure. The oxygen sensitises the tumour to radiation therapy. No side effects were found from the algae in this or previous research. The performance of the algae stayed the same when these were coated with red blood cell membranes to delay their clearance from the body.

Another application of algae that can produce oxygen in the organism is doping in sports. The algae can be tattooed under skin that is exposed to light containing enough of the wavelengths which the algae use and which can penetrate under the skin. For example, long-distance runners outdoors in warm weather have most of their skin exposed to sunlight, thus have a large surface area suitable for algal oxygen production. The additional oxygen from photosynthesis improves athletic performance. The only question is whether the oxygen generation is quantitatively fast enough to make a difference. In elite sports, every little advantage counts, so athletes are probably willing to use algae tattoos.

The algae are not dangerous even in deep blood vessels and tissues. Eventually the organism clears the algae, but the clearance of foreign particles is slower in the skin than in deep tissues, as evidenced by the persistence of ordinary tattoos. So the algae will last for a daylong competition.

Patients with breathing problems, for example with coronavirus-induced lung inflammation, may also benefit from algae tattooed on a large area of skin which is then illuminated with 660nm light. Such oxygen supplementation reduces the need for mechanical ventilation. Again, the question is the amount of oxygen from a whole-body algal tattoo.

Clock and ads projected on the ceiling

At a public swimming pool, the clocks on the wall are usually small, far and hard to see through droplet-covered goggles. The clock is relevant for planning to finish by a certain time and for tracking one’s speed (lap time). A solution is to use a projector to show a large clock on the ceiling, or to draw the numbers on the ceiling with a laser – essentially a programmed pointer.

The ceiling is also an untapped advertising display space, not just at swimming pools and gyms, but in any building. Ceiling ads are more valuable in swimming pools, gyms and yoga studios than in most other structures, because people doing backstroke, bench press or fish pose are facing the ceiling, which is not the case in a majority of buildings.

The floor is also mostly unused ad space. Projecting ads on the floor is not as useful as the ceiling, because people walking through the projector beam block the display.